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Just Outside My Door

August 16, 2011
By ELAINE G. COLE, CORRESPONDENT
Hello again folks, I’m enjoying this 72 percent summer morning. Thankfully we’ve had several rain showers the past few days, getting rid of the humidity and some of the heat. It was welcome rain and we could still use some more. Nevertheless, it perked up the flowers in the yard. It’s been cool enough for me to do some weeding and other outdoor work accomplished.

It doesn’t seem possible that we are already into the second week of August. The stores are advertising back to school clothes and other school necessities. They seem to be pushing them even earlier than ever. That’s because schools demand more and more items that parent’s must provide for their children. There are all kinds of tablets, notebooks, folders and more that the students must have. Some folk say they are glad we live in modern days instead of in yesteryear. But, when it comes to purchasing all the requirements today, I’m thankful that when our first three kids went to school, all they needed was a tablet, a pencil and sometimes certain types of paper were given to them. Of course our children liked to have a pencil box and new lunch pail, but those items are not often used in today’s schools. Our two younger boys needed a few more items, but not nearly as many as today’s youth.

Another thing I’m thankful for is that there were no pre-schools and kindergarten children only went half-days. Moreover, they didn’t have to know the alphabet and all the other things they do today before they could start school. In fact, they begin getting a goodly portion of their education when they are 3 years old. Supposedly it gives the children a better education, but I wonder. I believe they don’t need to be half grown up when they enter school. It does not give the child a very long babyhood and I think it makes them to grow up, mature, way too soon but that’s another story.

As for giving youngsters a better education with more adult opportunities, my dad didn’t start school until he was 7, graduated from high school in three years and was off to college. There was no kindergarten when I started school, but it didn’t seem to cause any problems with my education. I know, however, that kids today have much more difficult work to do at an earlier age and have homework nearly every night. Moreover, according to the statistics, more of them graduate without being able to read well and some quit school.

I realize I’m old-fashioned, but I liked raising my children myself, especially during their babyhood. Statistics written by Myrtle Bailey and others have said a child learns a third of all they will learn in their whole life, during their first five years. I always wanted to be the one loving, caring for and teaching them during those years. It wasn’t always easy and sometimes there were sacrifices to make, but the Lord always provided our needs and gave us wisdom. As He said, “If anyone lacks wisdom, let them ask God, with faith, and He will give it generously to all without finding fault. But, if one doubts he is like a wave in the ocean, blown and tossed by the wind.” (James 1: 5-6, my translation)

Don’t judge me to harshly folks. I didn’t say a mom should never work outside the home. Sometimes it is necessary. It is a private decision made by a man and his wife, but for us it proved the best way to go. I did, however, work away from home for a couple years when our first child was 3 years old and again a few times later, but I never felt right doing it. I have done freelance writing from home for many years and, after our children were grown, I was librarian at our local library for 11 years and enjoyed it very much.

I respect highly the mothers who choose to be stay-at-home moms at least until their children are in school, regular school. Also those moms and sometimes dads that home-school their children. I have seen many good, well educated children from such homes that go on to be very good parents and some who went to college to further their education and received honors. While I worked at the library, I found that the home-schooled youth were the ones that read a lot and not just fiction books. The were also well rounded, normal kids and I’ve read numerous articles and statistics that report many of those youth enter college with a greater education than public schooled ones.

For sure, no parents are perfect, but many raise children that become well-rounded, honest, successful adults. There’s no guarantee, but caring for them, loving them with unconditional love, playing with them, disciplining them and encouraging them according to their bend and with Gods help, they will be successful parents. Once they are of age, parents are not accountable for them, but still love them and encourage them. Also do the same for your wonderful grandchildren if you are blest with some. Of course the aforesaid is all my opinion.
 
 
 

 

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